Saul Rosenthal, PhD

HEALTH PSYCHOLOGIST

As part of this blog, I’m publishing the transcripts from my podcast. I hope you find them a useful adjunct to the show. Please listen, leave comments, and rate it on iTunes, Spotify, Google, or wherever you found it!

I talked with my Dr. Roseann Capanna-Hodge, an expert on holistic child health. We discussed parenting with all of the added demands brought on by the pandemic.

Link to Show: Episode 2: Parenting While Sheltering in Place
Guest: Dr. Roseann Capanna-Hodge
Link of interest: Dr. Roseann’s Blog

Saul Rosenthal: Welcome to episode two of Life in the Time of Corona. A podcast exploring the many ways to stay healthy and sane in these strange times. I’m Dr. Saul Rosenthal, a developmental and clinical health psychologist. One of the biggest challenges that many of us are facing is parenting our children when we’re all stuck together at home. I’m very excited to talk with today’s guest, Dr. Roseann Capanna-Hodge. Dr. Capanna-Hodge is the founder and director of Dr. Roseann and Associates. She is absolutely a thought leader at integrative and pediatric mental health care and has helped thousands of children and their families by spearheading innovative and holistic approaches to many difficult conditions. Dr. Capanna-Hodge has shared her expertise in articles, books, presentations and many media outlets. Thank you so much for joining us today.

Roseann Capanna-Hodge: Well, thank you for this important conversation because parents are inside with their kids and they’re feeling a lot of things, including frustrated. Some are excited, because there actually are some people kind of rocking the quarantine thing. But a lot of parents are feeling low on their resources right now, so this is a great conversation.

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April 20th, 2020

Posted In: Coronavirus, COVID, Parenting

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As part of this blog, I’m publishing the transcripts from my podcast. I hope you find them a useful adjunct to the show. Please listen, leave comments, and rate it on iTunes, Spotify, Google, or wherever you found it!

On the first episode of my podcast, I talked with my colleague Dr. Inna Khazan. She is an expert on integrating mindfulness with biofeedback, psychotherapy, and everyday life. I urge you to read any of her many articles and books.

Link to Show: Episode 1: Managing Stress and Uncertainty
Guest: Dr. Inna Khazan
Link of interest: Psychology Today Articles

Saul Rosenthal: Welcome to the premier episode of Life in the Time of Corona, a podcast exploring the many ways to stay healthy and sane in these strange times. I’m Dr. Saul Rosenthal, a developmental and clinical health psychologist. Staying healthy during the COVID-19 pandemic is about more than the virus. We are all suddenly cut off from our normal lives, friendships, school, work, religious worship, even shopping and entertainment have all transformed overnight. In this podcast, I’ll talk with experts to get their perspectives on living our best lives in these difficult circumstances. We’ll talk about the professional advice and some of their personal experiences.

I’m really fortunate today to welcome Dr. Inna Khazan to the podcast. Dr. Khazan is an expert in mindfulness and biofeedback focusing on health psychology and optimal performance. In addition to her private practice, she is a faculty member of Harvard Medical School, speaks and teaches internationally and consults with corporations and organizations that vary from the Stuttgart Opera and Ballet Company to the U.S. Army Special Forces. She’s on the boards of directors for many professional organizations, and is the author of numerous articles including some recent pieces for psychologytoday.com about adapting to the new normal. I’ll link to those in the show notes. She also has written two excellent books about biofeedback and mindfulness. The clinical handbook of biofeedback, a step-by-step guide for training and practice with mindfulness and biofeedback and mindfulness in everyday life, practical solutions for improving your health and performance. Inna, welcome to the premier episode of Life in the Time of Corona.

Inna Khazan: Thank you so much for having me Saul. It’s a pleasure.

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April 14th, 2020

Posted In: Coronavirus, COVID, Stress

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"Keep calm and carry on"

“What do we do?”
“I don’t know how I’m going to make it!”
“I can’t imagine what’ll happen tomorrow.”

These are just some of the things I’m hearing these days. The situation with the novel coronavirus changes almost minute-to-minute. We are living in a time of crisis. Uncertainty is the new normal. When the world around you seems out of control, and even the so-called experts are freaking out, What are we to do?

First, we need to remind ourselves that in just a few days, the world, to paraphrase Lin-Manuel Miranda (who in turned paraphrased others), is upside down. It’s not surprising that everything feels somehow off. Suddenly thrust into uncertainty, how do we respond?

Take stock. Check your perspective. Take a slow breath, low in your abdomen. Examine what you are doing. Are you glued to the Internet, looking for news? Constantly sharing the latest theories and advice through social media? Are you hunting down every last bottle of hand sanitizer (or, at this point, the ingredients to make your own)?

If you are doing any of these things, that’s okay. Many, many people are. However, if you want to reduce your anxiety, ask yourself — honestly! — “Is this a helpful response?

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March 19th, 2020

Posted In: Calm

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A recent article published in the academic journal Psychological Science questions the generally held belief that lots of screen time, especially around bedtime, is bad for adolescents. The article, “Screens, Teens, and Psychological Well-Being: Evidence From Three Time-Use-Diary Studies” followed over 17,000 teens in three countries.

This is an important study for a number of reasons. First, it includes a very large number of participants. Second, rather than relying on retrospective measures of technology use, the study uses a technique in which adolescents’ use is recorded throughout the day. Third, well-being is measured by caregivers as well as the adolescents. Finally, statistical analysis was designed before data collection. In other words, it’s not a fishing expedition. This is a really nicely designed study, strengthening confidence in its conclusions.

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June 2nd, 2019

Posted In: Digital Citizenship, Internet Addiction, Psychology of Technology

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I was lucky enough to attend an early viewing of How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World. I watched with a real mixture of responses; sad that it is the last movie in the trilogy, excited to see how the filmmakers deal with some of my favorite characters, blown away by the amazing look of the film. I left the movie with the urge to write about it. Not a review, which would be two words: SEE IT! Rather, I found myself mulling over the parallels between Hiccup’s and Toothless’s journey and our own development from childhood to adulthood. The curse of my decades trying to understand what makes us tick!

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February 3rd, 2019

Posted In: Development

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Last week I shared five tips about helping out when you give your child a smartphone or tablet.

But what about you? All those Black Friday, Cyber Monday, and end-of-year prices are tempting. Maybe it’s time for you to get a new device. If you’re taking the opportunity to treat yourself, why not also take the opportunity to review and strengthen your usage habits? 

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December 14th, 2018

Posted In: Digital Citizenship, Internet Addiction, Psychology of Technology

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With the end-of-year holidays at hand, you might be thinking about gifting your child a phone or tablet. I’ve previously written about helping your child develop appropriate online skills, and now I want to share some tips about setting your child up for success with their new device.

Many parents (myself included!) feel ambivalent about giving their child a smart phone or tablet. On the one hand, it’s convenient, you can keep tabs on your child, it’s the way of the world, and, of course, “everybody else has one!.” On the other hand, devices and subscription plans are expensive, many apps are a waste of time, social media is a jungle, and, of course, “I didn’t have one when I was your age and I grew up just fine!

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December 7th, 2018

Posted In: Digital Citizenship

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The idea that we can help the brain reshape it’s own activity to improve our health has always appealed to me. Neurofeedback is a non-invasive technique that encourages the brain to change itself. I particularly like neurofeedback because it allows me to integrate an evidence-based approach with a personalized approach to treatment. An individual’s own brain activity helps me determine the best neurofeedback approach to use.

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October 18th, 2018

Posted In: Treatment Thoughts

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Gaming Disorder is a new diagnosis for the upcoming 11th edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11). The ICD is the diagnostic “bible” published by the World Health Organization and used by health care providers around the world. While the exact criteria do not seem available, the WHO defines Gaming Disorder as:

a pattern of gaming behavior (“digital-gaming” or “video-gaming”) characterized by impaired control over gaming, increasing priority given to gaming over other activities to the extent that gaming takes precedence over other interests and daily activities, and continuation or escalation of gaming despite the occurrence of negative consequences.

For diagnosis, the behavior must significantly interfere with functioning and exist for at least 12 months.

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September 16th, 2018

Posted In: Internet Addiction

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In a recent piece written for the New York Times, Perri Klass, MD lays out ideas for 5 device-free spaces for families. The article does not directly focus on getting our children off of the devices. Rather, parental media use is the focal point.

He starts with Common Sense Media’s 2016 survey indicating that parents spend over 9 hours per day consuming media. About an hour-and-a-half of that time is work-related. The vast majority of time parents spend consuming media is personal.

What sort of model does that provide to our children?

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January 25th, 2018

Posted In: Digital Citizenship, Parenting, Psychology of Technology

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