Saul Rosenthal, PhD

HEALTH PSYCHOLOGIST

The idea that we can help the brain reshape it’s own activity to improve our health has always appealed to me. Neurofeedback is a non-invasive technique that encourages the brain to change itself. I particularly like neurofeedback because it allows me to integrate an evidence-based approach with a personalized approach to treatment. An individual’s own brain activity helps me determine the best neurofeedback approach to use.

(more…)

October 18th, 2018

Posted In: Treatment Thoughts

Tags:

Leave a Comment

In the article What your therapist doesn’t know, author and psychologist Tony Rousmaniere argues that therapists should incorporate metrics — data collected from questionnaires and similar measurement instruments — into our practice. In general, I very much agree with him, although it’s a complex topic with no easy answers. Rousmaniere, while advocating for utilizing metric-based feedback in treatment decisions, does a good job laying out both pros and cons. On the one hand, more and more fields are utilizing metrics as feedback to alter and improve performance, including health care. On the other hand, psychotherapy is an extraordinarily complex and individualized piece of work that might not lend itself to influence by statistical analysis. Before fully embracing data-based treatment, I think it’s important to consider a number of factors.

Speaking as a dataphile, the idea of utilizing objective information to improve my clinical work is fantastic. However, I’m not quite diving into the world of metric-based treatment right away. There are a couple of problems I have with it, particularly in the context of psychotherapy.

(more…)

March 21st, 2017

Posted In: Treatment Thoughts

Tags: ,

Leave a Comment

While I tend to keep my political views out of my professional work, I find myself tentatively venturing into the muck of some current politics with my clinician’s hat firmly on. A recent series of articles has examined a connection between Betsy DeVos, the (at this moment) nominee for education secretary and a company that provides neurofeedback and biofeedback services. Articles like What the heck is neurofeedback? from a site called Motherboard (update: the article seems to have disappeared) or DeVos-Backed Company Makes Questionable Claims on Autism, ADHD from the Education Week site don’t really bother me too much. And in fact these have been well rebutted by the International Society for Neurofeedback and Research.

However, once the New York Times got into the game I felt obliged to respond. The language of the article (actually all the articles I’ve read) is clearly designed to suggest there is something wrong with DeVos’ relationship with the company Neurocore. I am not here to comment on politics, DeVos’ qualifications, whether her relationship with Neurocore is problematic or whether Neurocore does good work.

Rather, I am here to discuss Neurofeedback. Because the New York Times article seems to be attempting to criticize DeVos’ relationship by delegitimizing neurofeedback as an effective treatment for numerous conditions. I would like to consider several points in the article. (more…)

February 1st, 2017

Posted In: Treatment Thoughts

Tags:

Leave a Comment